Leverage

Let’s say you run a baseball team and you want to sign a free agent pitcher. You’ve made a competitive offer for two-years, but the pitcher wants three. What can you do short of caving in and giving the third year to get the deal done quickly?

What if you float a rumor that you are in hot pursuit of a much, much, better starter? If the free agent pitcher finds that out, he might suddenly decide to take the two years from you and not run the risk that you will complete the trade and yank your offer to him.

This is the scenario I thought of when I heard the Mets, Marlins, and Yankees were in talks ok a trade where Noah Syndergaard ends up in the Bronx. This is a way for the Yankees to try and force Happ’s decision so they can move on down their shopping list.

My reasoning is simple, what would motivate the Mets to send one of their aces across town? I understand they have a new GM, but Syndergaard is going to bring back a good return wherever he goes and if he goes to the Bronx and pitches like he is capable of, the new Mets GM looks pretty bad. The risk for the Mets is really, really, high in that trade.

So before you head to sleeep with visions of Thor dominating for the Yankees dancing in your head, just stop and think it through. Then again, these are the Mets we are talking about, and I probably shouldn’t discount that part of it.